Home Page

Course Description -  Learn Fingerprints

The AIST curriculum using the one workbook and two textbooks concerning the science of fingerprints that
has been prepared by professionals.

The fingerprint course will teach students about the historical background of the science of fingerprints. In
the next step, the course acquaints with sufficient knowledge necessary to identity, understand, and
implement the eight basic fingerprint patterns according to the Henry System of Fingerprint Classification,
as prepared by the FBI.

Sir Edward Henry was an Assistant Commissioner of Police at Scotland Yard in 1901 that first developed
the eight basic fingerprint patterns classification system that is still being used by the FBI, Scotland Yard,
and law enforcement agencies throughout the world.  

At AIST students will learn to classify fingerprints according to the Henry System.  A significant portion of the
study’s concentration will be focused on the orientation of prints; detailed instructions and practical
applications of fingerprint patterns, ridge counting, whorl tracing, and interpretation; the study and evaluation
of loops, whorls, and arch pattern characteristics, and comparison of prints.

The AIST fingerprint course is designed to acquaint students with sufficient knowledge in order to identify,
understand, and implement the Henry System of the Fingerprint Classification Formula (FPC) that is
currently used on all law enforcement fingerprint cards, for classification.

A significant portion of the course will be spent on detailed instructions and practical applications of the
classification formula, which comprises the following six divisions: Key, Mayor, Primary, Secondary,
Sub-secondary, and Final.  Students will learn to classify and take ink prints on fingerprint cards according
to the proper FPC formula.

Students will learn how to physically obtain fingerprints for classification and / or comparison.  Students will
also learn, understand, and know how to conduct ACE-V (An acronym for Analyze, Comparison, Evaluation,
and Verification) methodology, which is the most current method used for identification or exclusion of an
individual fingerprint.  Students will learn how to present ACE-V examinations as evidence in a court of law.

This portion of the AIST fingerprint course will provide students with sufficient knowledge in order to identify,
understand, and implement the codes used by the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), which is a
computerized information system established to service all law enforcement agencies, including local,
state, and federal governments.

Understanding the NCIC is crucial because it is a widely used system that was developed to meet the
needs of police, as well as those of prosecutors, courts, and correctional institutions for prompt, up-to-date
information concerning an individual’s past criminal history.  As part of AIST’s comprehensive course, all
students will learn to classify fingerprints according to the proper NCIC codes.

Upon completion of AIST Fingerprint Course students will complete an
examination.